1. AIRPORT SECURITY: Screening plan ready at McCarran
  1. Vegas airport complies with new search rules day beforedeadline
      1. Fliers to encounter yet another change in security
  2. GIFTS
  3. GIFTS
  4. GIFTS
      1. EDITORIAL: Already out of control
  5. GIFTS
      1. Las Vegas executives share New Year’sresolutions
  6. tickets to see Celine Oton Jive
      1. August
  7. Charging for In—Flight Food

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AIRPORT SECURITY: Screening plan ready at McCarran
Airport complies with new search rules a day before deadline
IJ~(1 IRIS JONES
(iA~d1\G\‘1RI~
Security workers at McCarran International Airport didn’t wait for today’s federal deadline to begin examining each
piece of checked passenger baggage for explosives.
Although a new law requiring such searches took effect at midnight Tuesday. local employees of the Transportation
Security Administration started McCarran’s comprehensive explosive detection program earlier in the day. nearly a full
day ahead of the government’s deadline, said Jim Blair. who serves as federal security director at the busy Las Vegas
airport.
“We started this mormng and it’s been very, very good so far.” Blair said late Tuesday morning.
Still, Blair admitted the real test for McCarran’s new search procedures will come later tius week when some of the
estimated 270.000 to 290.000 visitors in town for New Year’s Eve begin returning home.
“New Year’s Eve is a light load at McCarran. Our real test will come in the next Iwo to three days.” Blair said.
On a typical day. McCarran handles an average of about 63.000 checked items, and on peak travel days that total can
reach close to 72.000 bags. airport officials said.
Blair’s team of nearly 1.000 TSA workers will try to ensure none of those items present a danger to the flying public, a
task they’ll work to accomplish using a combination of several truck—sized explosive detection system (EDS) machines,
smallerexplosive trace detection (ETD). hand searches and bomb-sniffing dogs.
McCarran~oined42t~other U.S. passenger airports in complying with the new niles requiring explosive searches. Blair
said, however, the updated procedures could cause problems for people who aren’t expecting such searches.
“It may take a little bit of time for us to smooth the procedures out. but our goal is to make it transparent to the
passengers.” Blair said. “The more we educate the public and the more the public is aware of the dos and don’ts. the
easier it makes it on them and their fellow passengers.
“When (TSA took over passenger) checkpoints, it took a while for people to understand what should and should not be
packed in carry-on baggage. Now it’s getting better
...
and the massive rush and cnmsh people expected over
Thanksgiving and Christmas did not evolve because the passengers were bett~educated about what they should do.”
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rtusmness: AIKF’OKI ~.~UKJ m Y: Screening plan reau\ at Mc(arran
Page 2 01 2
Blair urged lra\ elers to leave their checked baggage unlocked in case a federal worker needs to examine its contents.
“If people want to lock their bags. use zip ties,” Blair said, referring to small plastic devices used to secure baggage
much like a padlock. “The~‘re easy for screeners to remove, and we’ll replace them for people so their bags will stay
locked. If something packed caused an alarm. at least we can resol\ e that alarm easil\ without disrupting the passenger
(b~opening the bag).”
Bags that cannot be easil\ opened without being damaged will not make it aboard aircraft. howc\er.
“We’ll work with the the airlines to tr~to contact a passenger. but safety is paramount: we’re not going to put a
(suspicious) bag on just because we can’t contact someone,” Blair said.
Tra\ elers should also avoid placing food and be\ erages in checked baggage. pack shoes on top of other contents inside
suitcases. and place personal belongings inside clear plastic bags to reduce chances of a TSA screener having to handle
theni. Blair said.
Books should be spread out. not stacked inside suitcases, and film should no longer be placed in checked bags because it
could be damaged by new screening equipment.
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Las Vegas SUN: Vegas airport complies wimn new searcn ruies aav ociore ucaunne
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Vegas airport complies with new search rules day before
deadline
hi) I’KN~h
LAS VEGAS (AP)
-
Security workers at McCarran International Airport started examining each piece of checked
passenger baggage for explosives nearly a full day before Wednesday’s federal deadline. But the real test for the new
procedures will come later this week when holiday visitors return honie.
Although a new law requiring such searches took effect at midnight Tuesda\. local emplo\ ees of the Transportation
Security Administration started McCarran’s comprehensive explosive detection program earlier in the day, said Jim
Blair. federal security director at McCarran,
No glitches were reported. but that was before an estimated 270.000 to 290,000 visitors in town for New Year’s Eve
began returning home.
“New Year’s Eve is a light load at McCarran. Our real test will come in the next two to three da\ s.’ Blair said.
On a t~pical day. McCarran handles an a~erage of about 63,000 checked items, and on peak tra\ el da\s that total can
reach close to 72,000 bags. airport officials said.
Blair’s team of nearl\ 1.000 TSA workers will In to emisure nomie of those items presemit a danger to the flying public. To
do that, they’ll use a combination of several truck-sized explosive detection s~stem maclunes. smaller explosi~e trace
detection, hand searches and bomb-sniffing dogs.
McCarran joined 42$ other U.S. passenger airports in comiipl~ing with the new niles requiring explosi~e searches, Blair
said, however, the updated procedumres could cause problems for people who aren’t expecting such searches.
“It ma~take a little bit of time for us to smooth the procedures out. but our goal is to make it transparent to the
passengers.” Blair said.
Information from: Las Vegas Review—Journal
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USATODAY.comu
-
‘l’ravel
-
News
-
l’liers to encounter ~et anomner cnange in security
rage
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News’
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~~PRINTTHIS
Fliers to encounter yet another change in security
By Chris Woodyard, USA TODAY
For travelers who have rolled with every
Travel tips
little change in airport procedures over the
•How Sept. 11 changed air
past year, here comes a doozy.
travel
It’s the screening of all checked baggage for explosives set to begin at
11:59 p.m. Tuesday at airports across the nation.
It’s only the latest twist after more than a year of security changes
from travelers having to flash their ID several times as they go through
the airport to having to remember to put laptops in a separate tray for the
X-ray machine. It all followed the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
Airport and airline officials say they’re impressed at how well travelers
have adapted.
“From everything we’ve seen and heard, travelers are positive,” says Paul
Haney, a deputy director at Los Angeles International. “They sense a
greater level of security, but at the same time, they are being treated with
dignity and respect. Overwhelming evidence says it’s change for the
better.”
The latest change in baggage screening will
More business news
add to longer waiting time at the airport.
aMoney
front page
United Airlines, for instance, is recommending that fliers arrive 90
minutes before their flights. That tacks half an hour onto the previous
recommendation. United also says passengers should obtain a boarding
pass before going through security checkpoints.
At Los Angeles International, signs are being posted that warn travelers
to leave their bags unlocked. Another sign tells them to remove
undeveloped film from their bags before it goes through any of the 58
minivan-size explosive-detection machines, up from about a dozen
installed in the terminals a year ago.
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USATODAY.com
-
Travel
-
News
-
Fliers to encounter yet another change in security
Page
2
01
L
baggage-screening proceaures may vary among atrports. hut
Transportation Security Administration officials say they are working
toward standardizing procedures wherever possible around the country.
Find this
article at:
http:IIvv’ww.
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-screening-deadline. htm
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box
to include the list of links referenced in the article.
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THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 2003~USA TODAY
Air travel goes smoothly,
but real test coming next
By Laura Parker
USA TODAY
WASHINGTON
Travelers
who flew on New Year’s Day
reported few snags in the start-
up of security procedures that
require all checked bags to be
screened for explosives.
But Wednesday was a fairly
light travel day. The real test of
the new system will come this
weekend when holiday trav-
elers crowd airports to return
home.
A federal law requiring the
bag screening at all 429 com-
mercial airports in the USA
tookeffect at midnightTuesday
The law is the latest aviation
security measure put in place
sinc~the Sept. 11 terrorist at-
tacks. Screening for explosives
is designed to prevent terror-
ists from placing a bomb
United Airlines flight from Bos-
ton with his wife and two small
children.
Troy MacCormick, 30, said
his check-in at Buffalo was the
easiest he has experienced all
year.
He said the requirement to
leave bags unlocked does not
disturb him.
“I don’t normally lock them,”
he said. “But I did think about it
when I packed my leather
jacket in my bag today”
~J.1/iJLYNEVW~PAP~ERCL..LPP~NGS
PAGE ~
OF ~t~_
DATE COPIED:_~2~2~
aboard an airliner as they did in to lock their luggage.
1988 when Pan Am Flight 103
Chris Rhatigan, spokeswom-
blew up over Lockerbie, Scot- an for the TSA, said no delays
land, killing 270 people.
were reported.
Thescreening, conducted by
Officialsatthe security agen-
the federal Transportation Se- cy declined to identi~’which
curity Administration, primari- airports have not acquired the
ty involves sending checked explosives-detection equip-
bags through sophisticated X- ment because it could provide
ray machines as passengers information to terrorists. The
check in. There are 1,100 such machines are located near
devices in U.S. airports, with check-in counters at many air-
additional machines on order. ports and are easily glimpsed
Officials say at least 90 of the by travelers.
approximately 2 million bags
Passengers arriving at Dulles
checked each day will be International Airport outside
screened electronically
Washington on Wednesday
Bags thatare not X-rayed are morning had no complaints.
subject to hand searches, in- Most said they were aware of
spection by bomb-sniffing the new screening and had at-
dogs and precise bag-matching rived early for their flights in
to make sure all checked lug- anticipation oflong lines.
gage matches passengers who
“It was pretty seamless, ac-
board flights.
tually,” said Anil Kasibhatla, 34,
Travelers are instructed not who caught an early morning
By
I-I. USE,
Beiser. Uc,,
I
Newrules: ScreenerTim Gish puts a checked bag on the belt of
an X-ray machineat Baltimore-Washington International.

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EDITORIAL: ‘Just trust us’
Airline security mantra no longer instills much confidence
A spokeswoman for Southwest Airlines refuses to comment on the allegations of whistle—blower Loretta Fullingion. who
was fired four months ago as a local duty manager for Southwest’s contract aircraft janitorial and detailing comupany.
She charges the airline relies on untried janitorial workers to conduct federally requnred security checks of airplane
seats, designed to make sure weapons haven’t been surrcptitiotmslv stowed aboard.
But a United Airlines employee who spoke on condition of anon\’mmtv said followimig federal security guidelines in the
aftermath of the Sept. 11. 2001, terror attacks has been like trying to hit a moving target. “It changes sometimimes on a
daily basis,” lie says. The Transportation Security Administration has instnicted airline officials to withhold the written
procedures from the public, and “That’s probably one reason it’s not given out: it changes every week.”
Indeed, “Security directives contain security-sensitive informuation.” confirms Suzanne Lumber, an administrative
spokeswoman for the TSA in Washington. D.C. “We don’t want the bad guys knowing mar system.”
Furthermore, “When those airplanes are being cleaned they are airline property. so TSA does not have ,jurisdiction on
them.” Ms. Lumber asserts.
How curious, then
——
and how typical
——
that Southwest should insist the airline is following all federal security
guidelines relating to cabin security, while the TSA says it’s not its responsibility to even issue any such guidelines.
since “TSA does not have ,jtirisdiction on them” during cleaning.
Yes, the benefits of public oversight will occasionally be outweighed by security concerns
--
the saihimig
times of troop
transports. and all that.
But the underlying assertion lucre
——
that, “We’ve got it all umider control: we just cami’t tell you about it”
——
would instill a
lot more confidence were it not for the fact that even the most cursory federal audits have shown again amid again that
unauthorized personnel can easily gain access to secure areas of our major airports. while weapons manage to make it
through the X—ray baggage screenings as mmmcli as 50 percent of the time
-—
with busy McCarran Airport here in Las
Vegas producing among the worst results.
The missing component here is real accotmntabmlity. Everyone in the system today knows the buck doesn’t really “stop
here.” In the event of another catastrophic security failure, the airlines will simply insist. “It’s miot our fault: the federal
agencies set the procedures and we followed the procedures so we have no culpability.”
c.,L\~:J3(
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The federal agencies. omi the other hand, will poimit a finger back in the opposite direction and contend. “The oma—the—
groumnd responsibility is that of the individual airlines: they must have done it wrong.” Congress will enact a cap on
damages to forestall more airline bankruptcies: the taxpayers will end up footimag the bill agaimi: no one will really figuire
out what went wrong: the whole system will continue to operate mainly for show.
Is that really “the American way”’?
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Revicw~h,umal
EDITORIAL: Already out of control
Fledgling
bureaucracy has 40 percent too many workers
When the Transportation Secumritv Administration was created by Congress in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, fiscal
conservatives warned that the new agency could easily grow. kumdzum-like. into an employment service for bumreaucrats.
With Americans juistilmably concerned abotit their safety, incentives would be strong to grant the new bureau a blank
check to hire at will with little regard for the cost
...
or whether the personnel in place were acttmallv making life more
secure for the traveling public.
A year after its creation, those fears have come to pass.
Initially, lawmakers imposed a cap of 45,000 employees on the TSA. but the agency already has 64.000 people omi the
payroll
--
42 percent more than was authorized. The Associated Press reports the TSA circumvemited the hiring limits by
givimlg emplo~’ecsfive—year. “temporary full-time” contracts.
Such shenanigans have critics of the agency up in arms. Rep. Hal Rogers. R-Ky.. head of the House subcommittee that
controls transportation spending. said the agency “was growing too fast into a huge bureaucracy.” House Republicans
propose giving the agency $5 billion
--
far from peanuts. but still $200 million less than the TSA demands. The GOP
also wants the agency to direct more spendimig toward purchasing bomub-detection equipment at airports and “hardening”
airliner cockpits, rather than filling slots with warm bodies.
The critics are right. Withouit quiestion. serious gaps in security procedures at airports remain, Buit official Washington’s
response was apical: Got a probleiu. start a program. Creating a federal agency and giving it an open line of credit has
done nothing to improve safety, or enhance the accountability of the people who are ultimately respomisible: airline crews
and airport personnel
——
not to niemitiomi other passengers.
The Bush administration muight have merely stated that iuembers offlight crews do not sumrrender their Second
Amendment rights once the~’step inside an airport. The possibility of facing armued resistance woumld do more to improve
passenger safety than the umnseemlv. intnmsive searches of law—abiding passengers or a phalanx of clipboard—wielding
security agents.
Still. TSA chief James Lov defemids the additional him’ing. The agency’s work force is made up primarily of people who
screen passengers amid their luggage. though the AP says t~,00()of the new federal workers are airport security directors.
their deputies amid administrative assistants
--
in other words, muanagers who were previouisly employed b the airports
themselves and accountable to their local communities rather than faraway. inside—the—beltway bosses.
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Opinion: EDITORIAL: Already out of control
Page z
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Umifortumnately. aside from a few GOP stalwarts in the Houmse. there’s little stomach iii Washington to rein in the new
agency. Airhimies amid airport trade groups back the TSA. since the existence of a federal agency absolves them of
responsibility
--
and legal liability
--
in the event of another terrorist attack.
Amid congressional spending baromis. hidimig behind concerns for “national security.” cam1 view the agency as a gold
iuine
...
a huge new outlet for pork-barrel spcmiding. a wellspring of patronage jobs and a reliable source of political
support. All the while, the breaches in traveler secuirity which allowed the 9/11 attacks to succeed have mint been
repaired.
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Busimiess: Las Vegas executives share New Year’s resolutions
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Wednesday, January 01, 2003
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal
Las Vegas executives share New Year’s
resolutions
By HUBBLE SMITH
REVIEW-JOURNAL
!REAT_RAT
GREAT SER1i
It was a tough year for Alan
WaxIer, whose ground
transportation business
depends largely on the
health of Las Vegas’
convention and tourism
industry.
WaxIer, president and chief
executive officer of AWG
Charter Services, said
corporate business travel
has tumbled with the
slowing economy and
people are holding onto
their money a little more
tightly.
“It’s just been a very
interesting last 24 months
with all the stuff going on, a
little reality check with
September 11,” he said.
Randy Walker
Waxier was among several
clark county official has ntensive goals
business executives who
were asked by the Review-
Journal to list their New Year’s resolutions, either personal,
business or both.
~‘
Relocation
“To be a better leader for my staff,” he said from Florida, where
he was on vacation. “I’ve always got to improve. Nothing really
dramatic.”
Tom Schoeman, president of JMA Architecture Studios in Las
Vegas, said his business goals are to grow JMA by 12 percent in
2003, establish a second branch office location and acquire two
or three acres for a future commercial development site.
He also wants to imolement a desian and buildina comoanv,
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Martin-Schoeman LLC, with $40 million in contracts in 2003,
• Subscribe
• Report a delivery
problem
On the personal side, Schoeman said he wants to quit smoking
• Put the paper on
hold
.
.
• Report
a news
tipjpress
exercise five to six times a week, lose 15 pounds, increase his
release
net worth by 20 percent and spend more time with family and
• Send a letter to the editor
friends.
• Print the announcement
forms
Randy Walker has his work cut out for him next year. As if
running McCarran International Airport weren’t enough, the
Clark County official known for his shrewd financial acumen was
put in charge of getting the beleaguered Regional Justice Center
finished downtown.
The project’s cost has ballooned to about $185 million and it’s
more than a year behind in the construction schedule.
“One is to get a permanent solution to airport security baggage
screening to improve our customer service,” Walker said of his
New Year’s resolutions, “and No. 2 is to get the Regional Justice
Center completed. Both are pretty intensive.”
Walker said it’s been frustrating making progress on the justice
center, but he’s working on it and hoping to find a break.
“When I look forward to working with the Department of
Transportation on (airport) security measures as opposed to the
RJC, that tells you something,” he said.
Cindy Nevin, executive director of the Nevada Subcontractors
Association, is focused on her group’s efforts to reform
legislation dealing with construction defect litigation, a problem
that has driven some of her members out of business.
The subcontractors association has joined with other industry
groups to form the Coalition for Fairness in Construction, which
will lobby the Legislature next year to write laws that would give
contractors the “right to repair” defects, thereby curbing
litigation.
Her resolution: “working with our coalition partners to enact
equitable and reasonable solutions to unnecessary construction
litigation that brings homeowners and subcontractors to the
negotiating table first and not the courtroom,” she said.
For Shelli Lowe, the new year will be a time for introspection
and re-evaluation of personal relationships, based on advice
from a friend.
“I resolve to remember that the people I associate with have an
impact on both my life and income,” said Lowe, managing
director of Integra Realty Resources in Las Vegas. “I plan to be
more careful to choose the people I associate with,
“I want to seek quality, respect and growth. I plan on letting go
of draining, negative, incompatible, not-going-anywhere
relationships. There are some people in our lives that should be
loved from a distance. In essence, my resolution is to seek
pleasure and avoid pain.”
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1~l~I .~
UI
For someone who sends a million visitors to Las Vegas each
year, Bill La Macchia Jr. is going to practice what he preaches,
resolving to get to Vegas more often in 2003.
Other resolutions from the chief operating officer of Milwaukee-
based Mark Travel:
• Continue to rekindle and strengthen relationships with
business partners;
• Further champion the role of travel agents in servicing
customers’ vacation travel needs; and (our favorite)
• Be more patient with newspaper reporters.
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DECEMBER
30. 2002
LAS VEGAS BUSINESS PRESS
“The a
s have experi-
enced
a
difficult
year,
but
with a
jump
in
air
travel
over Thanksgiving, and
now another estimated
boost, we may be seeing a
new trend,” said Lisa
Fos-
ter of
AAA
Nevada
on
holi-
day travel projections.
•:. ,:. ,:.
“This is a
first
step,” Clark
County Commissioner
Myrna Williams said on the
creation ofa redevelopment
and economicdevelopment
agency.
.:, ,:~
.:.
“I would have been more of
a
surprise
if they had been
successful,”said
energyana-
lyst
Ronald
Tanner on Sierra
Pacific’s failed bid to amend
costly energy contracts.
•:. .:. .:.
Other
airports
around the
nation are doing a lot
worse,”
said McCarran In-
ternational Airport spokes-
person Hilarie Grey on a 1.1
percent decline in traffic
from last year.
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
PAGE ~
OF ~
DATE COPIED:~~”~22~

DECEMBER 30, 2002
LAS VEGAS BU~NESSPRESS
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DECEMBER 30, 2002
LAS VEGAS BUSINESS PRESS
Spirit Airlines
enters
local
market
- -
Spirit Airlines, the largest
privately-
held U.S. airlines, entered the Las Vegas
market late last month. Spirit offers daily
non-stop service from McCarranInterna-
tional to Detroit, with connecting service
to Fort Myers, Fla.
Singapore
Airlines begins
service
Singapore Airlines launched three
non-stop
flights
to
McCarran International Airport, giving
another travel option to the high-roller
Asian market. Japan Airlines’ five
weekly summer flights and three weekly
winter flights have been the only op-
tions for Asians wanting to see the val-
ley in the past.
United closer to Chapter
ii
McCarran International Airport’s
fourth largest carrier, United Airlines, fails
to get a U.S. federal loan guarantee and
inches closerto bankruptcy. The nation’s
largest carrier filed in bankruptcy court a
few days later.
November
National
ceases operations
National Airlines, a closely held car-
rier with 1,500 employees, ceased opera-
tions Nov. 6, after a previously announced
$112 million financingagreementcouldn’t
be completed.
Las Vegas-based National Airlines
ceased operations after failing to emerge from
bankruptcy.
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
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July
-
August
File Photo

DECEMBER 30,2002
________________
LAS VEGAS BUSINESS PRESS
Airline travel soars for holidays
More than 103,000 Nevada residents are ex-
pected to travel by air this holiday season. That’s a
4.9 percent increase from the 2001 holiday season.
More than 480,000 Nevada residents are expected to
travel at least 50 miles or more through the end of
the year. Nearly 80 percent of those residents are
expected to travel by car. That’s a 2.8 percent drop
from last year. AAA researchers credit the increase
to renewed confidence in airline travel.
America West reaches deal
with pilots
America West Airlines, the second-busiest car-
rier at McCarran International Airport, and the unon
representing its 1,800 pilots agreed on a tentative
contract that includes several compromises pro-
posed by a federal mediator. The airline and union
have been in talks since February 2000, although
negotiations were put on hold for about six months
after the Sept. ii terrorist attacks. Final terms are
being drafted, the Air Line Pilots Association said. A
company spokeswoman declined to comment.
DAILY NEWSPApER CLIPPINGS
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DATE CQPfED:/~.or~,

WSJ.com
-
America West Air to Begin Charging br In-Flight I’ooa
I~age1 01
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January
2, 2003
America West Air to Begin
THE PRICE
OF THE
TICKET
Carriers Toughen Ticket Rules As

Back to top


Charging for In—Flight Food
12/11/02Lawyers
Probethe Legalities2
By SONOKO
SETAISHI
The Middle
Seat:
Airlines Stop the
Gouging; What Took Them So
DOW ,R)NES NE\VSWIRES
Long?11/271023
In a test with potentially far-reaching consequences for the troubled airline
• Airlines Try Business-Fare Cuts,
someindustry.flights.AmericaIf enoughWesttravelersAirlines
willprovebeginwillingchargingto
pay
passengersfor
the pri\
for
ilege
meals
of
on
11/22/02
Find They Don’t Lose Revenue4
dining on airline food, the eighth—largest U.S. airline may begin selling food
• American Airlines Drops
on all its flights lasting longer than 2 2 hours.
Coffeemaker10/25/02
From Jets5
Under
America
West’s “Buy on Board” program. coach passengers will be
offered the opportunity to bu\ meals ranging from a $3 snack box to a $10
Chicken Kiev dinner. Currently, the Phoenix carrier doesn’t serve food on the
COMPANIES
lest routes. Starting Monday, America West is planning to sell food on a
Dow
Jones Reuters
doien flights a da~
-
for three weeks, and then evaluate the response.
America West Holdings Corp.
(AWA)
Food service has been a vexing issue for the airline lndustr\. which had
PRICE
1 .90
billions of dollars in losses last year and is under intense pressure to cut
CHANGE
0.10
costs. Following the terrorist attacks in 2001 and the resulting travel slump.
U 5 dollars
11 ‘56 a m
airlines including America West drastically curtailed food service. The lack
of food has made a number of passengers cranky and become a symbol of
At
Market
Close
flier fnistralion
in an
age of stepped-up securit~hassles and fewer flights.
This isn’t the first time America West has experimented in a sensitive area. In March.
it
cut fares sharply on the
expensive. last-minute tickets used by business travelers. In some instances, it slashed ticket prices by more than
two—thirds. The competitive response was fierce and immediate: Major rivals rushed into America West’s main
markets with punishinglv low fares designed to force it to restore the price\ business fares. America West held its
ground. and b~the end of 2002, several other airlines including
Delta
Air
Lines
and American Airlines were
testing similarly priced business fares.
AMERICA WEST A LA CARTE
Tired of being the butt ofjokes from late-night comics, airline
executives ha\ e long wanted out of the costl\- food business
A sampling of the airline’s menu choices and
(American spent $778 million on in-flight food and drinks in
prices.
2001) but didn’t want to be the first to drop meals or sell them.
Now that America West has taken the lead, other airlines ma~be
Shorter
flights
(2-3
hours)
tempted to follow suit.
Snack box with cheese, Wheat Thins, nuts,
beef jerky and cookies: $3
A spokesman for Northwest
Airlines
sa\s it is “studying” the idea
of selling food on-board its flights.
• Snack
box
with a hot sandwich, chips and
salsa, and chocolate bar: $5
Medium flights (3-4 hours)
American Airlines says it has no plans to sell food on its flights.
Earlier this year, the compan\ scrutinized its cost structure and
• Steak Caesar Salad. $5
concluded that selling food would be more complicated and
expensive than its traditional food service, according to Gus
• Ice cream: $3
Whitcomb. a spokesman for the airline. American has weighed
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
A
~,au
I
OF
http://onliioe.ws~.coin/articleprint/0..SB 1041449600835661 373.00.html
.
r
-
1/2/2003
~

WSJ.coni
-
America West Air to begin Charging br In-Flight i-’OOQ
rage
L
01
-)
Longer flights (4+
hours)
dropping food service altogether on domestic coach flights. The
company has said it would do that only if customers had other
• Chicken Kiev with salad, baked potato, green
options. To that end. American is in “early discussions” with food
beans and dessert. $10
vendors and airports to have vendors sell food at the gate. Mr.
• Omelet, potatoes, sausages, apple cobbler,
Whitcomb says.
strawberries and muffin: $8
-
America West’s new approach begins next week, Flight attendants
will announce the food sales at the gate and again on—board the flight. A menu card with photographs of the food
will by displayed on the food cart. Only cash will be accepted as payment. Hot meals on longer flights will be
served on china, while cold meals will be served in Japanese-style bento boxes. The portions will be more generous
than those traditionally served in coach, the airline says.
Not for Profit
The company says its customers have repeatedly asked about buying food on flights. “We wanted to try to provide
our customers what they’re asking for without having to increase ticket prices.” says Janice Monahan. an America
West spokeswoman. The compan~’doesn’t envision food sales as a profit center. (America West currently serves
coach—class meals on certain flights lasting more than four hours and first—class meals on some flights lasting three
hours or more.)
So what’s available’? Three dollars gets you a snack box packed with cheese, Wheat Thins. nuts. beef jerky and
cookies. Five dollars will get ~ou a fancier snack box with a hot sandwich, chips and salsa and a chocolate bar.
These will be served on flights that last for 2’/2 to three hours, including flights to Seattle and Houston.
A Big Bun
On longer flights from Phoenix, including those to Atlanta and Cleveland. fliers will have the oppor1unit~’to snap
up a breakfast cheese—omelet sandwich on a French roll for $5. Another breakfast choice is a “very large”
cinnamon bun that also costs $5. On the menu for lunch and dinner: a choice of a beef tenderloin patty melt
weighing about a half pound. a steak Caesar Salad or Chicken Milano
--
a hot pasta dish
--
for $5. Ice cream will
be offered for $3.
This won’t be the first time an airline will charge for food. European carriers, particularly charter operators and
low-fare airlines like eas~Jetand Ryanair, sell meals on their flights.
Serving food on airplanes can be notoriously expensive. Having a truck deliver goods to an airplane costs $500 or
more, even if it’s delivering iust ice and peanuts. according to Robert Mann. airline analyst and consultant at R.W.
Mann & Co.
——
Ron Liehe,’ contributed to this article.
Write
to
Sonoko Setaishi at sonoko.setaishi(i,dowjones.com
URL
for this article:
http://online.wsj.com/article/O, SB 1041449600835661473,00. html
Hyperlinks in this Article:
(1) mailto:sonoko.setaishi@dowjones.com
(2) http://online.wsj.com/article/0,, S B1 039549749265914233,00.html
(3)
http://online.wsj.com/articie/0, SB 1037742610587549108,00. html
(4) http://online.wsj.com/article/0, ,SB1037915616678766388,00. html
(5) http://online.wsj.com/article/0, ,SB1035498237983751 00. html
j,daied January’
2,
2003
D/~LYN1~WSPAP~RCLIPPINGS
PAGE ~
F ~
liitp://online.wsj.com/articleprint/0..SB 1041449600835661 473.00.html
DATE COPIED:

USATODAY.com
-
‘l’ravel
-
News
-
UniteC grantee access ro btSuuIvm
rage I UI
-.
~•
!3o~k,~
—~
~PRINTTHIS
United granted access to S800M
By Marilyn Adams, USA TODAY
CHICAGO
A federal judge gave United
More business news
Airlines final approval Monday to tap $800
Money front page
million in bankruptcy financing it needs to
keep flying.
But getting the other $700 million in cash from lenders hinges on a
complex set of steps falling into place in the next weeks and months.
United, which has lost about $4 billion since mid-2000, sought Chapter
11 bankruptcy protection Dec. 9. Lenders have agreed to provide $1.5
billion for restructuring if the carrier meets strict earnings and cost-
savings goals starting in February.
To meet those demands, United is seeking
$2.4
billion a year in labor
cost savings. Last week, it reached agreements with leaders of several of
its unions to cut pay starting Wednesday. But its largest union, the
International Association of IVlachinists, representing 37,000 of United’s
80,000 workers, has been holding out.
United has asked bankruptcy Judge Eugene Wedoff to give it the right to
impose pay cuts on all workers if necessary. LAM said it will file an
objection to that request today. United will have about a week to respond
before the judge rules.
United wants a 130
0
pay cut from lAM members, who include
mechanics. But lAM, whose members won new contracts and significant
raises a few months ago, has been unwilling to negotiate.
Last weekend, pilots union leaders agreed to a 29 pay cut, and flight
attendants officials to about
90
~,
Both measures are subject to a vote by
members, which will take until Jan. 8. If passed, they will be retroactive
to Wednesday.
The pay cuts would give a huge boost to United’s cash flow. The airline
says the cuts, including those for lAM, would save it about $70 million a
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
PAGE~~tQF~
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I/us
mtod I\ prmntthis click ibmlmt~com/pt/cpt ‘iction cpt&expire&urlTD ~
1/2/2003

USA’l’ODAY.com
-
Iravel
-
News
-
Unmteu grantee access uo ~asuuivi
L
UI 1.
month.
But if any of the unions reject the cuts, United will seek the court’s
permission to force the issue, and that brings a risk of labor turmoil.
To restructure and emerge from Chapter 11, United needs more than pay
cuts from its workers in the next few months. The airline also wants
controversial, broad changes in labor contract language to reduce
staffing, allow more out sourcing of maintenance and permit more flying
of small, efficient regional jets.
United also has told the unions it wants a two-tier wage scale so it can
launch a national, low-cost, low-fare airline subsidiary to compete with
discounters Southwest, Frontier, JetBlue and others.
While it’s asking unions for pay cuts, United won approval Monday to
hire a host of expensive advisers, including restructuring consultants, a
public relations firm, accountants and regulatory and labor lawyers.
It also will hire aircraft-financing experts to help it negotiate sharp cuts in
its aircraft-lease payments.
Find this article at:
http://www. usatoday.com/travel/news/2002/2002-1 2-31 -united.htm
El Check the box to include the list of links referenced in the article.
3ook~
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPP1NGS
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..~j
~664
OF
1/2/2003

~E~ft~O2Op2_____________
LAS VEGAS BU~NESSPRESS
Compeütors
unfazed by
United mess
By
Brian
Sodoma
Staff Writer
After
a
recent
bankruptcy filing,
execu-
tives at United Airlines are filling headlines
with hopeful glimpses,
but mostly painful
realities, about the
company’s future.
As the possibilities
for flight and em-
ployee cuts loom, McCarran International
Airport’slargest carriers said it’s businessas
usual. If
United does
make
cuts in its Las
Vegas service, it likely will not change the
plans for its local rivals.
“It’s
one
of those things that’s a wait and
see
type of thing,” said Whitney Eichinger, a
spokesperson for Southwest Airlines. “Typi-
cally, we add service to where our customers
are looking to
go. Typically we don’t add
things that would reflect what other carriers
are doing. We’ll just be sticking to our busi-
ness plan.”
With 171 daily departures, Southwest is
the largest carrier at McCarran.
Eichinger
said Las Vegas is Southwest’s
second-largest market,
and added that it was
“extremely profitable” for
the airline.
Southwest will add two daily Chicago
flights in February, and it recently began
service to St. Louis from McCarran.
For the
coming year, however, thel’e are no schecl-
uled route additions for
Las Vegas or any-
where
in
its
nationwide
system. she said.
“For 2003, we
haven’t
announced
any
new
cities,
and that usually means we’ll be
adding more service (to existing cities),”
she
said.
Patty Nowack, a spokesperson for
See
(limited, Page 14
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Continued from
Page 1
America West Airlines, the second-largest
carrier at McCarran, said that
carrier is
taking a similar approach. She added that
the current airline market
as a whole is still
suffering
from a lack of demand.
“Right now, the supply of seats in the
system is greater than demand. If United
makes capacity cuts we’ll be monitoring
the situation to see if there are routes
where
demand is
greater than supply. Then
we’ll evaluate the possibility of adding
flights,” she said.
Delta, McCarran’s fourth-largest car-
rier with22
average
dailydepartures, added
that it was not lookingspecificallyat United
routes to take over.
“There are a number of details to con-
sider when adding routes.
We’re always
aware of what’s going on. But we’re not
looking to capitalize on United’s situation
just because they pull out of a specific
market,” said Anthony Black, a western
region
spokesman for Delta.
The question of demand in the Las
Vegas market has been a sketchy. Passen-
ger
count is down 1.7 percent year-to-date,
but McCarran officials, like economists,
maintained a guarded optimism
for the
future. Illey have indicated that demand
for
Las Vegas flights will remain high, de-
spite last month’s National Airlines clo-
sure, which cut 36 daily departing flights
from the
airport, and United’s
33
daily
de-
partures
in danger of shrinking.
National’s
gap has been only filled
marginally
by a few flight
additions
td)
key
markets served by the former Las Vegas-
based carrier.
“Las
Vegas and the Convention Au-
thority and the hotels did such a great job
with
remarketingthe community after
Sept.
11, we’re slowly creeping back. We
(McCarran) are well above national aver-
ages with our passenger counts. Other air-
ports around the nation are doing a lot
worse,” said McCarran
spokesperson
DAILY NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
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~)ATECOP~ED:~L~~
~~ER3O2O0~~
___LAS VEGAS
BUS
I NESS PRES
United
FUe photo
Despite the bankruptcy of United Airlines, other carriers have not changed their plans.

____
LAS
VEGAS BU~NESS P RESS
Hilarie Grey.
Grey also said she has not heard ofany
potential United cuts to McCarran, nor did
she expect alarge impact on the airport if
the carrier did.
“This is a lot like what was happening
with National. United is not the largest
presence here. If they do cut flights, we
suspect it will be much moredevastating to
its hub cities (Denver and Chicago),” she
said. “In United’s big picture, we’re such a
small station. We really don’t carry a lot of
meat. We’re more of aspoke as opposed to
a
hub.”
Keith Schwer, director of the Center
for Business and Economic Research at
UNLV, said National’s exit from the market
and United’s situation are signs ofthe over-
all industry’s contraction, which will ulti-
mately allow other carriers to change their
mix of flights and perhaps move flights
from weaker markets to Las Vegas.
The
drop in flights at McCarran also
means fewer empty seats coming in and
out ofthe airport, Schwer said, which bodes
well for efficiency of other carriers. But he
also said, the cuts could result in price
increases
in
the market.
“The rates are what’s coming into play
here. We’re a tourist market, where typi-
cally our rates have been lower. Rates will
probably go up because of the contracting
in the airline industry, which could lead to
a disincentive for people to come to Las
Vegas in the future,” Schwer said.
But Schwer said he could not directly
quantify the impact of such activity yet on
the Las Vegas market.
“Yes
it’s
affecting us, but we really
can’t tell you how much. We haven’t
done
that
type
of
research yet,”
he
said.
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USATODAY.com
-
Iravel
-
News
-
About .3 U.s. iliglits a cay see smoKe, imre event
rage I
UI
~PRINTTH~S
About 3
U.S.
flights a day
see
smoke, fire event
By Gary Stoller, USA TODAY
Smoke or fire incidents occur on an average of at least three U.S. airline
flights a day, according to a recently published estimate by a former
senior official in the Federal Aviation Administration.
In-flight smoke and fires
mainly in inaccessible areas and
compartments on airplanes
result in more than 350 unscheduled
landings annually, estimates L. Nick Lacey, now an aviation industry
consultant for the Morten Beyer & Agnew firm in Arlington, Va.
Lacey headed the FAA’s flight standards office before he left the agency
in 2001. He and a colleague studied the adequacy of smoke-elimination
standards and procedures for EVASWorldwide, which sells emergency
equipment to help pilots see through smoke.
More than one in 5,000 U.S. airline flights encounter smoke or fire,
leading to at least one in 15,000 flights making an unscheduled landing,
their report says.
Some aviation safety experts say Lacey’s estimates, which he calls
conservative, point out the need to develop plane fire codes and address
electrical problems. Earlier this year, the National Transportation Safety
Board said air crews need more training to fight in-flight fires and called
on the FAA to study the feasibility of redesigning planes so fires behind
interior panels would be easier to put out.
“The airlines are exempt from all state and local fire codes,” says
consumer safety advocate Paul Hudson, who is also a member of the
FAA’s rulemaking advisory committee. “We’ve requested over and over
to plug this deficiency. Commercial airliners are the only major public
spaces not required to have fire-detection and suppression equipment
wherever a fire could break out”
In 1998, the FAA issued a rule requiring fire-detection and fire-
suppression equipment in cargo compartments but not in other areas of a
plane. The rule followed the deaths of 11 0 people aboard a smoke-filled
~ 1
1
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1/2/2003

USATODAY.com
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News
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About 3 U.S. flights a cay see smoke, lmre event
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FAA spokesman Paul Takemoto says the FAA has conducted an
extensive assessment of wiring safety on airplanes, As a result, it has
developed plans to improve wiring maintenance and design and identify
degraded wiring, which can cause electrical fires aboard airplanes, he
says.
Lacey says his study’s calculations are based on a 2000 study done by Jim
Shaw, a safety expert for the Air Line Pilots Association. Shaw’s study
found that airlines filed 1,089 reports of smoke or fire on airplanes from
Jan. 1, 1999, to Nov. 2, 1999, with the FAA.
More than half the incidents were “high-temperature” events, such as
sparking, arcing or burning, and 82 were related to electrical systems
or components, Shaw said.
Flight crews often did not know where the smoke or fire originated, he
said.
For years, the FAA has looked at ways to improve the safety of electrical
wiring. A short-circuit in wiring was the most likely cause of a fuel-tank
explosion that killed all 230 people aboard a TWA jumbojet in 1996, the
NTSB says.
Wiring is also one of the suspects in the crash of a Swissair plane that
killed all 229 aboard near Nova Scotia in September 1998. That accident
remains under investigation by Canadian authorities.
Find this article at:
http://www. usatoday.com/travel/news/2003/2003-O1 -02-airsmoke htm
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